MPH@GW Cross-University Courses

OT@NYU students can take the following courses from MPH@GW, the online Master of Public Health (MPH) program from the George Washington University:

The Biologic Basis of Disease in Public Health
2 credits

The goals of this course are (1) to provide an overview of current knowledge about the biologic mechanisms of diseases that are major causes of death and disability in both developed and developing countries; (2) to understand and interpret the reciprocal relationships of genetic, environmental, and behavioral determinants of health and disease within an ecologic context; and (3) to provide opportunities to analyze, discuss, and communicate biologic principles of disease across the biologic and the public health spectrum.

Biostatistical Applications for Public Health
3 credits

This course explores the application of biostatistical principles to the critical analysis of retrospective studies, prospective studies, and controlled clinical trials, as well as studies in the health services literature. Methods explored include data selection, basic calculations, and interpretation of statistical methods for the detection of significant associations and differences.

Principles and Practice of Epidemiology
3 credits

This 3-credit course will introduce the general principles, methods, and applications of epidemiology, the basic science of public health. The textbook emphasizes current methodologic concepts in epidemiology and will also introduce students to newer conceptual models of disease causation. The course is designed for students who seek to understand epidemiologic literature and for those who will become practicing epidemiologists. Topics covered in the course include: approach and evolution of epidemiology, history of epidemiology, outbreak investigation, measures and comparisons of disease occurrence in populations, major sources of health data in the US and globally, analysis and interpretation of disease patterns, hypothesis development and testing, the major epidemiologic study designs, analysis of bias and confounding and methods for assessing and for controlling for its effects, concepts of disease causation, screening, public health surveillance, and critical evaluation and synthesis of research. Lectures and case studies include applications of the theory and practice of epidemiology to cancer, other chronic disease, and infectious diseases.

Environmental and Occupational Health in a Sustainable World
2 credits

This introductory course examines the connection between population health and exposures to chemical, physical, and biological agents in the environment. By using problem-solving frameworks, students will become familiar with key data and information sources, methodologies, and policy approaches that address the public health impacts of environmental and occupational health hazards, including the consequences of climate change, demands on natural resources, and industrial and agricultural production. The course will integrate key concepts of environmental health with principles of sustainability to illustrate how public policies and practices on the local, national, and global levels affect population health.

Management and Policy Approaches to Public Health
3 credits

This course provides an introduction to basic principles, concepts, and skills related to public health management and policy. The course focuses on management and policy approaches to public health at three different levels: the system, the organization, and the group/individual level. A third of the course will concentrate on the larger, system issues surrounding the organization, financing, and delivery of health services in the United States along with policy typologies and frameworks and the legal basis for health policy interventions. A third of the course will examine policy and management at the organization level. This segment will explore organization theory and design, organization change, financial management, and crafting a policy analysis for an organizational decision-maker. The last third of the course will be dedicated to the group and individual. Subjects include personnel management, teams and team performance, and communication. Throughout the course, the interrelated nature of management and policy will be reinforced.

Social and Behavioral Approaches to Public Health
2 credits

This course examines the complex relationships between social context, behavior, and health at both the individual and community level. It identifies key social and behavioral aspects of health in the United States and throughout the world and presents theories that facilitate interventions aimed at improving health and wellbeing.

Introduction to the US Health Services Delivery
2 credits

This course introduces the systems that define and shape delivery of health services in the United States. Case studies and presentations on major issues develop an appreciation of dilemmas confronting policymakers, providers, and patients: balancing cost, quality, and access. Topics examined include healthcare access and disparity, healthcare professions, facilities, managed care organizations, government healthcare programs, and policy changes that have majorly impacted American healthcare in the past century.

Global Health Program Evaluation
3 credits

Students will gain skills in the fundamentals of program evaluation and monitoring methods. Students will also understand the evaluation aspects of major international health programs such as the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the President’s Malaria Initiative. Country-specific case studies will be used as synthesizing tools to review major concepts and assess student knowledge of key concepts.

Comparative Global Health Systems
3 credits

This course examines what national health systems are, how they differ, and how they are performing. Health systems will be analyzed through four different lenses: healthcare organization, health workforce development, healthcare financing, and health policy development. The course compares health systems and health reforms in seven regions of the world and draws lessons on how health system performance might be improved.

Planning and Implementing Health Promotion Programs
3 credits

In this course students will develop skills to effectively plan, implement, and manage programs that address public health problems for defined populations in a variety of settings.

Introduction to Public Health Communication and Marketing
3 credits

This course introduces communication theories and methods used in promoting health and preventing disease. Students will gain a theoretical background in communication and behavior science and practical communication development methods.

Data Management and Analysis
2 credits

This course will introduce students to the practical aspects of dataset creation, data management, rudimentary statistical analysis, and tabular and graphical presentation of results in the user-friendly environment of SPSS. Through hands-on experience, students will learn how to perform such routine tasks as: creating codebooks, entering and cleaning data, deriving new variables from existing ones, choosing and implementing appropriate analytical techniques, graphing and tabulating their results, and documenting and protecting work. The course material will be grounded in examples drawn from commonly encountered situations in prevention and community health such as needs assessments and various forms of program evaluation.

Community Organization, Development, and Advocacy
2 credits

This course educates students in how to organize community groups to promote health. The focus is on learning how to use resources available in the community to advocate for change.

Leadership Seminar
1 credit

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn leadership lessons from the careers of a diverse group of leaders who are successful executives and entrepreneurs from multiple sectors, including corporate, government, nonprofit, and the arts. Students will discuss and reflect on leadership styles, be exposed to leadership theory, develop effective networking skills, and be prepared to effectively engage with their peers, personal network, potential employers, and business partners. The Leadership Seminar deliberately provides a unique setting for students to consider themselves as leaders in their personal lives and their careers.

Researching Violence Against Women and Girls
2 credits

This course will provide a detailed overview of the intersection of violence against women and girls (VAWG) and public health given the demonstrated and significant impact that violence has on the health of the survivor, her current and future children, and communities. Through readings, lectures, and assignments, students will become acquainted with the set of rigorous methods and best practices for conducting applied research on VAWG. The course draws from Researching Violence Against Women: A Practical Guide for Researchers and Activists by Mary Ellsberg and Lori Heise, which was crafted through the collective experiences and insights of many international researchers and advocates. The course is designed for those with previous exposure to public health, as it builds on methods learned in previous course work. The content will cover ethics, qualitative and quantitative research design, and monitoring and evaluating interventions specific to VAWG and culminate in the development of a full research proposal. After completing the course, students will be able to conduct research that is fully grounded in the principles of scientific inquiry and generate knowledge that can be used for social change.

Monitoring and Evaluation of Sexual and Reproductive Health Programs in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
2 credits

This course will give students a practical overview of key sexual and reproductive health challenges in low- and middle-income countries and offer insight into designing and measuring programs that address those challenges; these include family planning, abortion, maternal health, and gender-based violence. The course comes from the perspective of applied researchers working within an organization that implements sexual and reproductive health programs and services. The course has three sections. Section 1 provides an overview of sexual and reproductive health conditions relevant for low- and middle-income countries. Section 2 discusses intervention strategies appropriate to these sexual and reproductive challenges. Section 3 covers monitoring and evaluation approaches to assess program effectiveness and impact in this field. Reading and course work will provide students with practical tools to design and measure their own program strategies. Students will complete a series of assignments building to a final project proposal designed to address a specific sexual and reproductive health problem in a county of their choice. These assignments will build upon the foundational skills developed in previous public health course work.

Global Environmental and Occupational Health
2 credits

This course examines critical global environmental and occupational health topics with an emphasis on the factors that significantly contribute to the global burden of disease. The primary focus of the course is on low- and middle-income countries. The course is participatory and incorporates principles from behavioral sciences, development economics, risk assessment, and epidemiology. The course aims to underscore potential solutions to environmental health problems, highlighting metrics used to measure impacts as well as areas for future research.

Global Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Programs
2 credits

This course is designed for students who may be working in disaster and development settings of developing countries where contaminated water, inadequate sanitation, and poor hygiene (WASH) cause serious health problems. In this course, important WASH concepts will be covered so students can understand what is needed to develop, implement, monitor, and evaluate a WASH program or a WASH component of multi-sectoral programs. It emphasizes the need to develop effective, appropriate, accessible, and affordable WASH interventions to reduce the global burden of disease.

Social Dimensions in Climate Change and Health
3 credits

This course explores the drivers of climate change and outcomes with a particular focus on health dimensions. This course will address drivers, obstacles, vulnerabilities, inequality, and adaptation as well as technical and social solutions.

Researching Climate Change and Human Health
3 credits

The world now faces climate change as an incontrovertible fact that poses serious public health challenges for the 21st century. From increased wildfires to urban infrastructure threats, from emerging infectious diseases to increased heat-related illnesses and deaths, this course draws on the wealth of evidence compiled by the National Climate Assessment (NCA) to examine the myriad ways that climate change is affecting human health. NCA themes are used to guide each week’s topics, which include: widespread impact, the ecological context, oceans of change, infrastructure, water resources, energy, land use, and heat and air quality. Epidemiology, exposure assessment, risk assessment, and environmental engineering serve as the disciplinary bases from which health evidence is examined. By reading and discussing research studies, students will emerge from the course more knowledgeable about current climate change and human health evidence and more proficient in interpreting study findings.

Introduction to Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology
3 credits

This course covers the epidemiologic methods for studying environmental and occupational health problems. Students will explore epidemiologic exposure assessment methods and methods relevant to cohort, case-control, cross-sectional, and cluster investigation studies. Other topics covered include identifying sources of and evaluating biases and confounding as well as designing surveys and questionnaires.

Public Health and Law
3 credits

Designed for students in the health professions and law, this course examines how law can both promote public health and conflict with the constitutionally protected rights of individuals. It introduces the legal concepts that underlie the public health system and inform public health policy making in the United States. Topics covered include the role of law in public healthcare and policy, major areas of public health activity, and the future of public health.

Law, Medicine, and Ethics
2 credits

This course explores legal, ethical, and policy issues that arise in the biomedical arena. The content addresses controversial and challenging questions concerning, inter alia, the definitions of life and death, the nature of personal identity, the requirements of justice, and the boundaries of liberty. Students will draw on legal, medical, and ethical/philosophical literature to examine these issues. Prerequisite: Public Health and Law or instructor permission.

Prescription Drugs, Policy, and Public Health
3 credits

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts and issues related to prescription drugs, policy, and public health. The content is structured to walk students through the life cycle of prescription drugs, beginning with research and development and ending with the public health impact of drugs, such as prescription drug abuse. The course will review key policies and public health programs related to each stage of a prescription drug’s life cycle, including Congressional funding, with a focus on speeding the development and approval process of needed drugs; public and private approaches to increase access to prescription drugs; and exceptions to international laws that allow some countries to violate a prescription drug patent for the sake of improving the health of impoverished citizens.

Global Health Communication Interventions
2 credits

This seminar provides students a foundation in key behavior change and communication theories relevant to global health communication interventions. Case studies in lectures and readings illustrate the application of theory in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health communication programs. Skills attained will enable students to apply theory to public health practice within a global context. In addition, students will practice essential communication skills for practice in the healthcare field.

Global Health Diplomacy
2 credits

This course introduces students to the concept of global health diplomacy, starting with historical case studies of how diplomacy has been used to advance health agendas, and conversely, how health issues have been used to improve diplomatic relations between countries. Students examine formal health diplomacy, multi-stakeholder health diplomacy and informal health diplomacy, and comparative studies of how different countries have devised health diplomacy strategies. This course will challenge students to read and interpret health related agreements, negotiate a position, and assess the policy context while trying to advance a health agenda.

Preventing Health Disparities
2 credits

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how social, political, and economic factors such as race and ethnicity, gender, and geography contribute to disparities in health and healthcare and how to use evidence-based approaches to prevent or address health disparities. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to understand, define, measure, and develop methods to address these issues. This course will review theoretical frameworks and methodological tools for students to conduct research and develop interventions to reduce health disparities. The main objectives for this course include examining personal attitudes, acquiring knowledge, and gaining the skills to evaluate, discuss, and develop the programs, interventions, and policies designed to prevent or address disparities in health and healthcare.

Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health
2 credits

This course is intended to provide an introduction to qualitative data collection and analysis for public health practice and research. It introduces the philosophy, goals, and basic methods of qualitative research as applied in public health areas such as behavioral research, health communications development, program development, program evaluation, and health policy. Through readings, lectures, and short field exercises, students will become acquainted with the set of methods most commonly used to collect and analyze qualitative data. Data collection techniques will include in-depth interviewing, mapping, participant observation, focus groups, and systematic methods of qualitative data collection. After completing the course students will be able to prepare an interview guide, conduct an in-depth interview, and analyze and write up the results of a qualitative project.

Marketing and Research for Public Health
3 credits

This course focuses on the use of marketing research techniques to better understand customers of public health programs and thereby improve program design, implementation, and effectiveness. A range of qualitative and quantitative techniques will be studied for their relevance to program planning, development, continuous improvement, and outcome evaluation. In the commercial sector, the purpose of marketing research is to help managers and marketers know their prospective or current customers so that they can develop products and services that will provide value to – and be valued by – their customers. Public health practitioners must always keep in mind that, for the most part, public health programs are voluntary in nature. That is to say, prospective customers are free to accept or reject the products or services offered to them. Success in public health therefore typically hinges on the ability to design products and services that benefit populations and are valued by beneficiaries in the intended target audience. This course is intended to teach students how to use marketing research techniques to achieve these goals.

Economic Evaluation for Health Promotion Interventions
3 credits

Policymakers and program planners are increasingly required to prioritize investment in public health promotion interventions based on the value that these programs bring to society. This course provides an introduction to the theoretical basis and practical skills needed to estimate the effectiveness, population impact, and cost of health promotion interventions to inform policy and practice using cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses. Case studies and presentations will allow students to apply these skills and to critically evaluate the assumptions and methods of incorporating economic evaluation into public health program planning and evaluation. The course will address the need to place economic evaluation into the broader context of the implementation, equity, and political considerations driving prioritization of public health promotion investments.

Fundamentals of Nutrition Science
3 credits

This course provides presents the fundamental scientific principles of human nutrition. Students will describe food sources, recommended intake levels, biochemical roles, mode of digestion, absorption, metabolism, deficiency/toxicity symptoms, and special considerations for each macronutrient and micronutrient. Nutrition assessment, study designs in nutrition science research, the role of nutrition in chronic disease, and current topics in nutrition science will also be discussed in detail.